Friday, March 20, 2020

Germany February 2020

Resultado de imagem para VW e-Up!

Record month

Following the start of the new CO2 EU rules, the German plugin market has (finally) clicked and February signaled another record performance, its second in a row(!), having registered 16,508 units in February, growing 144% YoY, with last month plugin share reaching a record 6.9%, pulling the yearly tally to 6.7%, helped by the 9% fall of the overall market.

Despite BEVs continuing to grow at a fast pace (+76% YoY), the lights are focused on PHEVs (+279%!!!), with several new models hitting the market, allowing plugin hybrids to continue outselling pure electrics, even if the difference is negligible (51% vs 49%).

Looking at the fuels mix, diesel continues to slide (32% in February), while unplugged hybrids are growing, now with 9% share, meaning that 15.7% of the German market is already electrified. Not bad, eh?

February had a surprise leader, with the VW e-Golf winning its first Monthly Best Seller title since last July, with Volkswagen milking its electric hatchback to the last drop, thanks to generous discounts, allowing it to hit 1,475 deliveries, its second record performance in a row(!), so it seems the veteran EV is set to end its career with a high note.

But the German maker didn't stopped there, with two other models in the Top 5, the small e-Up was 4th, with 679 units, its second performance in a row, while the Passat GTE ended the month in 5th, with 640 units.

So, 3 out of 5 for Volkswagen, with two consecutives records to boot. Not bad, VW, not bad, at all...

The remaining two spots went to the Renault Zoe (#2, with 1,352 units), and the indestructible Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (#3, 821), with this last one continuing to impress by its vitality.

Pl
Model
Sales  
1
VW e-Golf
1,475
2
Renault Zoe
1,352
3
Mit. Outlander PHEV
821
4
VW e-Up!
679
5
 VW Passat GTE
640

Regarding the 2020 table, the two front runners are already winning a sizeable distance over the competition, and only the #12 Tesla Model 3 can aspire to get close to them, but for that to happens next month, it will need to pull a record result in March, that although not impossible, it has become more difficult due to the current Covid19 crisis.

With the VW e-Golf ending its career in a few months, and the expected general slowdown in the coming months, only the Renault Zoe can hope to give some fight to the VW ID.3, in the race for the 2020 title.

Well, if the production ramp up of the ID.3 is indeed happening, as the several car park pictures prove, actual ID.3 registrations are still in symbolic numbers, with only 81 deliveries last month.

Not that the Volkswagen Group needs it now to grow, besides the rise and rise of the VW e-Golf, the Passat GTE midsizer was up one position to #4, and the small e-Up climbed to #7, while on the Audi side, the e-Tron stepped one position to 6th, thanks to a record 591 units (second in a row), and the A3 PHEV jumped four positions, to #14, thanks to 466 registrations, its best performance since 2017.

Finally, Porsche's new baby, the Taycan, had 195 deliveries, a new high for the sports sedan, as the ramp up continues to evolve, we might see it soon in the Top 20.

But the Volkswagen Group didn't have the exclusive of good performances in his Top 20, with the Mercedes C300e/de jumping into the Top 10, in #9, while BMW 330e was up to #11 and the Tesla Model 3 rejoined the table, in #12, with the Californian set to jump into the Top 5 next month.

Outside the Top 20, there's plenty to talk about, like the BMW X3 PHEV (95 units) ramping up production, the new Kia Soul EV registering 229 units, a new high for the Korean MPV-disguised-as-crossover, while Volvo continues to increase its electrification rate, with its S/60 PHEV twins scoring a record 308 units, and the new XC40 compact SUV having 143 deliveries.

Mercedes has finally found a way to ramp up production of their new plugin models, with the compact A250e registering 112 units, the new midsize SUV GLC300e delivering 121 units, while its all-electric sibling, the EQC, has finally crossed into three-digit territory (Yay!!!), with 109 units

In the brands ranking, the Volkswagen Group has a 1-2 lead, with Volkswagen (16%, up 1%) leading the way, while Audi (11%) is in Second Place, closely followed by the #3 Renault (10%, down 1%) and BMW (10%), while the #5 Mercedes (9%, up 1%), is getting ready to run for for the medals positions.







Midsize Car Best Sellers

Pl
Model
Feb.
Sales  
1
VW Passat
5,282
2
BMW 3-Series
4,364
3
Audi A4
4,061
4
Mercedes C-Class
3,723
5
Skoda Superb
1,383

With the Tesla Model 3 in an off month, we have four models with a significant degree of electrification, with the leader VW Passat having 12% of its sales coming from the GTE version, while the #4 Mercedes C-Class has 17% of sales coming from its PHEV versions, and the #2 BMW 3-Series, 12% share. 

But the champion of electrification is the #5 Skoda Superb, with 20% share.

Which leaves the Audi A4 as the only unplugged model...Until when?


Midsize SUV Best Sellers


Pl
Model
Feb.
Sales  
1
Mercedes GLC
2,864
2
BMW X3
1,295
3
Audi Q5
1,319
4
Volvo XC60
1,418
5
Mitsubishi Outlander
1,024

We have a fully electrified Top 5, although these models have various degrees of electrification, from the 4% PHEV share of the Mercedes GLC, to the 80% of the Mitsubishi Outlander, passing by the 7% of the BMW X3, 13% of the Volvo XC60 and the 22% of the Audi Q5.

This last performance begs the question: When will Mitsubishi make the Outlander an entirely plugin model?

Anyway, 5 electrified models out of 5 is already something, and with the Merc GLC PHEV and BMW X3 in ramp up mode, things will look even better in a few months...


Full Size Car Best Sellers


Pl
Model
Feb.
Sales  
1
BMW 5-Series
2,551
2
Audi A6
2,377
3
Mercedes E-Class
2,242
4
Volvo S/V90
372
5
Mercedes S-Class
329

With the exception of the #2 Audi A6, all other models have PHEV versions, with the #3 Mercedes E-Class hitting a significant 24% share, while the #1 BMW 5-Series reached 10%, and the #4 Volvo S/V90 twins had 16%.

Finally, the flagship Mercedes S-Class had just 4% of its sales coming from its PHEV version, something that will surely change in the upcoming next generation.


Full Size SUV Best Sellers


Pl
Model
Feb.
Sales  
1
Mercedes GLE
1,004
2
VW Touareg
859
3
BMW X5
708
4
Audi e-Tron
591
5
Volvo XC90
550

The full size SUV had a slow month regarding electrification, with two unplugged models on top, the leader Mercedes GLE delivered just 4 units of its PHEV version (for some reason Mercedes Germany is not betting in the 350de version), while the (still) unplugged VW Touareg was the runner-up last month.

The #5 Volvo XC90 has grown its PHEV share to a significant 40%, while the BMW X5 PHEV represented 17% of the X5 sales, so added to the full EV Audi e-Tron represented the 3rd plugin model on this Top 5.

With the new VW Touareg PHEV coming soon, and (hopefully) the Mercedes GLE350de finally starting to be delivered in Germany, it will be a matter of time until this Top 5 becomes fully electrified.

29 comments:

  1. From the posted data, 2019 carmaker standings are:

    1st Volkswagen Group with 9254 vehicles
    2nd Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance with 4839 vehicles
    3rd BMW Group with 3079 vehicles
    4th Daimler with 2294 vehicles
    5th Groupe PSA with 793 vehicles

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm confused: I understood the S-class already is using a next-gen power train? (Since it needs the larger battery to qualify for subsidies in many markets, unlike the smaller models...)

    The poor sales would be likely due to the fact that subsisidies in Germany come with a price cap. (Unlike in several other markets.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The strange thing about it, is that the BMW 745e represents more than 20% of the 7-Series.

      Why this difference?

      Delete
    2. Good question. Could be production is still ramping? Maybe a smaller price difference? Different dealer attitude?...

      Delete
  3. I'd say it would be quite a disappointment if anyone can give the ID.3 a fight on its home turf...

    (Regarding deliveries, we have known for months that production is ramping, but customer deliveries won't be commencing before summer...)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I don't expect the Model 3 to be hampered by the virus much in Germany: last I checked, we aren't in full lock-down -- so deliveries shouldn't be significantly affected. Also, for the same reason, the economy shouldn't take that bad of a hit; and along with pretty strong job security guarantees (and good social security in general), I don't think many people would be cancelling orders because of a fear that suddenly they can't afford it...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Not sure what the definition of an MPV is: but I always thought of the Soul as a wagon in disguise...

    Which explains the good performance of the BEV version in Norway (no "real" BEV wagons available...), as well as the good performance in general in the US. (Similar practicality to a "real" wagon, but without the stigma...)

    Though I guess that same reasoning works with "MPV in disguise" :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Antrik, i have a Kia Soul EV, and considering it is much bigger inside than one expects from the exterior dimensions, has a high roof (1,61 mts) and has a small trunk (288 liters), i think it is closer than an MPV than a station Wagon.

      Delete
    2. I'll take your word for it :-)

      Also, congrats! I talked to the owner of the only Soul EV I have seen live yet, and he really really liked it: said it was better than any combustion car *or* EV he ever owned... (Though to be clear, that didn't include any Teslas.) I was also pleasantly surprised by the exterior: the quirky look works way better in life than on photos :-)

      Delete
  6. I doubt the Outlander will go full BEV, it sells well because it's the cheapest electrified suv/4wd I believe. The BEV SUVs are more luxurious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The suggestion was that it could go PHEV-only -- not BEV.

      However, considering that the main reason why auto makers like PHEVs, is that they can easily build them on the same platform as combustion-only cars, I don't see much motivation for Mitsubishi to give up on the combustion-only variant, even if it's just a minority of sales...

      Delete
    2. Yeah, maybe, but still, it would help my job to track the Outlander PHEV sales :-D

      Delete
    3. So selfish! ;-)

      Delete
  7. Congrats Germans for buying a record 16 508 PEVs. Its understandable that they are buying more PHVs than BEVs, after all its the country that invented ICE.
    No idea whether ID.3 will launch in summer given the bad virus situation. At least I am hoping that it comes in Fall which is before 2020-12-21.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's an interesting point. While I don't believe the virus is a real reason for further delays (since software developers usually can work from home just fine), it might very well be used as an excuse... And if overall car sales are down, there is likely also a bit less urgency to bring more EVs to market to offset fleet emissions averages.

      Delete
    2. Regarding PHEV preference: while the combustion engine heritage is certainly among the reasons why most legacy car makers prefer pushing PHEVs over BEVs, that applies for *all* legacy makers, not just the German ones...

      Delete
  8. There are 3 major categories of light duty 4 wheeled passenger vehicles.

    3 box type: Bonnet, passenger and cargo are the 3 boxes.
    Sedan/Saloon (4 door), Coupe (2 door), Pickup (2/4 door).

    2 box type: 5 door vehicles with Bonnet, passenger + cargo as 2 boxes.
    Wagon, Van, SUV, CUV, MPV, MUV are all the same. The slight difference is only in the type of doors, ground clearance, etc which is really trivial. A typical car has 1.4700 mm while a typical crossover has 1.500 mm, so its just 300 mm in diff.
    Ideally all these vehicles should be classified as crossover. Soon those vans which sliding doors will go away.

    1 box type: Vans without bonnet as sold in Asia, Europe. So the passenger + cargo + bonnet tucked inside is 1 box.
    Now the cybertruck is also 1 box since the bonnet is embedded into passenger section as seen from side.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This classification makes little sense, as it's pretty much entirely stylistic. The differences that matter are not about the exact shape, but rather things like door arrangement (presence of rear hatch, sliding doors, absence of rear passenger doors...), seating arrangement, size of cargo area, as well as ride height and seating height.

      Admittedly, the traditional classifications tend to mix them up somewhat arbitrarily, as many of the differences are on a sliding scale, and often blurring over time. The Kona "crossover" and the Bolt "hatchback" for example have the same dimensions, and are really the same type of vehicle, differing only cosmetically: with the sole distinction being the shape of the bonnet...

      Delete
    2. @antrik

      Of the 6 different types of vehicles, crossovers combined the best features.
      More interior space than hatches/wagons because of height, higher ground clearance that helps in off-roading, lesser weight than SUVs because of unibody frame and that is why this segment controls around 40% market share in worlds 3 main markets (China, Europe & America).
      Mini & microvans with <= 9 passenger capacity have only 3% marketshare and may disappear in next 5 years. So is the fate of wagons/hatches. SUVs buikt on truck chassis control 8% marketshare in USA, but this segment may also lose as many 7/8 seater crossovers are coming to market.
      Eventually only crossovers will be there.

      What is weird is calling a vehicle as crossover in 1 market and wagon in another market. Chevy Bolt is 1 example. Often there is confusion and arguments in blogs. Thats why I wrote that all 5 door vehicles are same 2 box type vehicles with just cosmetic changes.

      Delete
    3. Nobody calls the Bolt a wagon. Where did you get that weird idea from?

      While large SUVs are indeed quite roomy (they are essentially elevated minivans with different styling), typical crossovers are not actually much roomier than traditional hatchbacks of similar size -- and certainly not roomier than wagons. As far as I can tell, the current preference for higher vehicles is mostly a fad; and is indeed increasingly getting diluted, as the term "crossover" is applied more and more broadly: you pointed out yourself that an average crossover is not actually much higher than an average traditional hatchback. (Though the exact number you cited seems suspiciously low...)

      Thus there might indeed "eventually [be] only crossovers": but only in the sense that everything gets a "crossover" label tacked on, even if it would have been called something different in the past -- see the Kona example, or even the Bolt in some instances. But there will still be vehicles with different door arrangements, seating arrangements etc.

      Delete
  9. Slowly the BEV, PHV battle moves closer in # to FHV (full hybrids) and this will sting Toyota; a company that is fighting against all PEVs. May be this could also force Toyota to sell more FHVs. Unltimately we want to burn less oil and pollute less.
    Lets hope we all overcome the virus and then things come back to normal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please don't invent your own terminology: this only disrupts communication. We already have universally accepted abbreviations for plug-in hybrids (PHEV) and plug-less full hybrids (HEV).

      Delete
    2. @antrik

      The objective is not to confuse, but to clearly differentiate between the vehicles with engines and those that are not.
      Hybrids have engine + motor. Since they have motor, they are electric and no need to have E in them. So lets have a H in the middle for these vehicles
      PHV - Plugin Hybrid Vehicle
      FHV - Full Hybrid Vehicle
      MHV - Mild Hybrid Vehicle

      Then we have vehicles powered by motor alone and so we will have E as the middle letter in them.
      BEV - Battery Electric Vehicle
      FEV - Fuel cell Electric Vehicle

      And then, we have
      PEV for Pluggedin Electric Vehicle which combines BEV + PHV. I agree that this may not be a perfect term since it combines vehicles with and without engines, but no other alternative. Similarly there is
      XEV - All electrified vehicles which combines, PHV, FHV, MHV, BEV, FEV.

      This way, we can have a simpler 3 letter acronym for all vehicles.

      Delete
    3. The existing terms already have a clear meaning, which is well understood by anyone following the space. Inventing your own terms doesn't clarify anything.

      Indeed your terminology is very poor: it doesn't cover things like Nissan's new "e-Power" serial hybrids, or the i3 ReX serial plug-in hybrid. The problem is that it focuses on the drive train, while the more important aspect is the power source. (Most diesel railway locomotives for example, and many ships, are actually diesel-electric -- but that doesn't make them EVs. Without a battery, they aren't even hybrids.)

      BEVs are powered by electricity; HEVs are powered by hydrocarbons; PHEVs can be powered by either; while FCEVs are typically powered by hydrogen. (Although some types of fuel cells can also work with hydrocarbons...) This terminology is not perfect either -- but still better than yours.

      Delete
  10. I don't know about you, but I really like BMW cars I like the design language
    - Lidinco -

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like "youngtimer" BMW's, like the E30-E46 3-Series, the first two generations of the 6-Series, the Z1/3/8, or the original 8-Series.

      As for current BMW's, i only find the i3/i8 interesting, the rest i find them too much...bloated.

      Delete
    2. I never liked the design of *any* BMW, except for the i8 -- which is being discontinued...

      Delete